Search: 
Last updated on October 16, 2014
Homepage | Archives | Contact Us | Week in Town | About Us | Register  Sign In   Email Us Text: Large | Medium | Small
Actress Lynda Bellingham dies at 66 |  Some paedophiles 'won't be charged' |  Brits my boss, not Barroso, says PM |  Fire leaves half power station shut |  Twin guilty of murdering brother |  Child poverty targets 'won't be hit' |  Kate's second baby due in April |  Dewani dubbed 'cold and controlling' |  Movers hit as Bank system stops |  Bank of England warns on bankers' pay |  Man held over football match drone |  Man jailed for anti-Semitic MP tweet |  Mansion tax 'at least £250 a month' |  Celtic goalkeeper attacked in street |  BBC Radio 1 broke swearing rules |  Gatwick to begin Ebola screening |  DJ Mike Read defends UKIP Calypso |  Mystery clown 'disturbing' children |  City retains curry capital title |  African solar plan to power UK homes |  Toddler in hospital after 'assault' |  FM meets abuse cover-up claim woman |  Remains of hurricane to hit Wales |  Man defrauded grandfather of £20,000 |  Carrier bag charge comes into effect |  Aberdeen nominated as dismal town |  Double decker bus crash injures 45 |  Kissing men told 'get off bus' |  Cunningham named new St Helens coach |  'Balotelli must improve massively' |  The fighter pilots who navigated war using a school atlas |  On the tracks of Australia's last record maker |  Why are our obsessions never the things we're best at? |  UKIP's alliance in Europe rescued |  Equal parental pay for Civil Service |  Untested drugs bill a step closer |  VIDEO: House of Commons |  AUDIO: Nursing morale at 'heartbreaking' low |  VIDEO: UK poised for autumn storm |  VIDEO: Nepal survivor: 'Not my day to die' |  VIDEO: Aberdeen up for 'most dismal town' |  VIDEO: Who is calling who in Rochester? |  VIDEO: Charge for carrier bags in Scotland |  VIDEO: 'Cold call' pension scam warning |  VIDEO: Mental health and motherhood |  Scandalous tales from the British embassy in Paris |  What laws currently cover trolling? |  Mother helped son flee IS in Syria |  Life after university for disabled graduates |  VIDEO: Take a look at the Dr Who video game |  The king of discount voucher codes |  Why firms don't want you to be brilliant |  Where the Beatles lived in Liverpool |  A big week for the NHS |  My Sleeping Beauty syndrome nightmare |  EU migration and child poverty - the papers | 

 [HyperLink20]


eid

Tip Us Off
Events
> More Events
 
 Apex BusinessToday Muscat Daily Al Isboua Al Youm
‘Good writers borrow, great writers steal’
Our Correspondent, March 06, 2013 Email to a friend  | Print
Not Rated Rate This Article
 

Children love Caroline Lawrence. And it shouldn’t come as a surprise as, in her own words, she is still a child herself. The children’s book author held the elementary and middle school students of The American International School of Muscat (TAISM) in a spell as she told them how to spin a few tales themselves. “Good writers borrow, great writers steal,” she said as the school’s performance hall reso-unded with the amused laughter of the children.

She led them through a seven-step process of story-writing, making it seem like no big deal to the young, imaginative minds in the audience. Soon they were milling around for an autograph. On her first trip to the sultanate, she hoped the Arabian winds would inspire her for a new series. “I’m a big fan of Islamic architecture and dress. I love the food. And I love the desert as I grew up in Bakersfield, California,” she said.

Caroline now calls London home, a city she has grown to love for its cosmopolitan culture. She has been prolific, with 17 books to her credit in The Roman Mysteries series alone, the two-part Roman Mystery Scrolls, the first two instalments of the Flavian Trilogy, two books in the Western Mysteries/PK Pinkerton Mysteries, short stories and non-fiction books. 

Her Roman Mysteries series is popular in London owing to the fact that it is part of school curriculum, but are yet to find a big readership in the US, she noted. For the PK Pinkerton stories in the West-ern Mysteries series, Caroline went  location-scouting in the US and found inspiration in photographs and music from the Wild West.

“A plot structure helps you write very fast. I took several writing classes and realised that I didn’t know how to write a plot. Call it serendipity, but that’s when someone lent me a set of tapes by a Hollywood script doctor. They served as a road map,” she said. But writing was never part of the initial plan. She grew up adoring Nancy Drew, her ambitions changing from astronaut to anthropologist (Jane Goodall was another hero).

While travelling in Europe hoping to go to Greece in her gap year, she found herself stuck working in Switzerland. But being left with little money to afford any fun activities there, her parents sent her two books - The Last of the Wine by Mary Renault and Homer’s Iliad. “I read about goddesses gossiping on Mt Olympus which sounded like women in the hairdressing salon around the corner. I thought this couldn’t have been written 2,000 years ago. This is so similar to what is happening now.” Fascinated, she enrolled to study Greek classics at Cambridge.

Her heroes are not entirely the stuff of fairytales. “Flavia is quite annoying, even bossy actually,” she said of her teen girl sleuth from the Roman Mysteries series. “I don’t like heroes who are perfect though a lot of children’s heroes are. I’m more attracted to characters with flaws, whose weaknesses are their strengths. For example, PK Pinke-rton is a weirdo.”  Children’s books no longer come with characters who are pure good or evil. Children in the past were not as flawed then as they are now, she explained.

Caroline believes it is essential to have a children’s mentality to write for them. “I don’t write for children, I write for me. Like children, I still expect everything to be fine.” Writing stories which progress on conflict, she said, makes one believe that perhaps some good can come out of it. “Animals have instincts, but people have stories to tell them how the world works.”

In an age when bedtime storytelling is slowly disappearing as a tradition, Caroline said it is one of the most unconditional ways of loving a child. “My mother used to read to me and my siblings even when we were 12-13 years old. Only, by then it was Sherlock Holmes. The detective genre is probably the most popular in the world,” she said adding that anyone trying to figure out how the world works is a detective. “I like to think I revived historical fiction for children in England, combined with my love of detective stories.”
Her books have been translated into 20 languages. Caroline is now working on the next PK Pinkerton story. “I’m waiting to be inspired. I’ll probably set it in the 1960s during the Flower Power era on a movies set.”

Her books have already resulted in a BBC series. She writes the books in a way that they can be easily adapted into film. “Screenplay writing is like writing haiku when compared to an epic poem. My unfulfilled ambition is to win an Oscar for screenplay writing,” she said. Forever the optimist, Caroline is certain that children will never give up books no matter what substitutes technology brings their way.

  

Reader Comments




Post a Comment  
Please click post only once - your comment will not be published immediately

 

 



MyWeek
 

Shot of the Week

Poll
 


  © Apex Press and Publishing, P.O. Box 2616, Ruwi 112, Muscat, Sultanate of Oman Tel: +968-24799388 Fax: +968-24793316
Developed By Omania E-Commerce